Archive | Ethnic cleansing

Trump’s defense: A house is not a hole

Leave it to the worst U.S. president in history to bring the office down a few more notches by making this remark at a meeting about immigration last week: “Why are we having all these people from shithole countries come here?”

The Washington Post reported the quotation, and that was that for a day or so, until it dawned on the dummy-in-chief that people outside his base thought his remark had been despicable.

So then, of course, he tweeted “…this was not the language used at the meeting.”

Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin, who was present at the meeting, rebuked Trump and added that the “shithole” remark was in keeping with the rest of what Trump had said to those in attendance: “He said these hate-filled things and he said them repeatedly.” And Republican Sen. Lindsay Graham, also at the meeting, more-or-less went along with the Post’s account.

But then, incredibly, Trump attempted to turn the shitstorm in his favor by trotting out two Republican lackeys — Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas and Sen. David Perdue of Georgia, both at the meeting — who reportedly said that our fearless leader had said “shithouse” countries, not “shithole” countries.

Scholars took note. The leader of the free world might have said “shithouse” instead of “shithole.” Untold millions had begun to wonder if Trump harbored cruelly racist feelings about poor, non-white peoples and was stupid enough to voice those feelings in front of congressional leaders at a meeting about immigration.

Thank God he cleared that up!

Expert slams Trump response to Puerto Rico

Hurricane Maria: How You Can Help the People of Puerto Rico (5 photos)

Donald Trump (and his handful of supporters) have defended his pathetic response to the devastation in Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria. Reports coming from Puerto Rico dispute everything Trump has said. Trump’s response to criticism from the Mayor of San Juan was to lash out over Twitter. Disgusting. Well, enter the former head of the United… Continue Reading →

Chris Cuomo to Rep. King: ‘You’re trying to white cleanse the population’

Steve King Says The "Greatest Danger To A Black Man In America Is Another Black Man"

CNN host Chris Cuomo objected to Rep. Steve King’s white nationalistic pleas of having more babies being born in western Europe and America “to rebuild our civilization” away from the brown people with weird beliefs, “It sounds like you’re trying to white cleanse our population.” Rep. Steve King from Iowa was always considered an extremist nut… Continue Reading →

Ethnic cleansing and the Republican party

And then there’s this:

The Dutch far right’s election donors are almost exclusively American

This is an actual struggle for the future of our nation. We can’t afford to hand it over to the Nazis.

White supremacists at the wheel

Jeff Sessions Asks 46 US Attorneys to Resign as ACLU Files Complaint

Read what Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III said in praise of this 1924 law. Bannon and Co. really believe this stuff:

In seven years we’ll have the highest percentage of Americans, non-native born, since the founding of the Republic. Some people think we’ve always had these numbers, and it’s not so, it’s very unusual, it’s a radical change. When the numbers reached about this high in 1924, the president and congress changed the policy, and it slowed down immigration significantly, we then assimilated through the 1965 and created really the solid middle class of America, with assimilated immigrants, and it was good for America. We passed a law that went far beyond what anybody realized in 1965, and we’re on a path to surge far past what the situation was in 1924.

The Atlantic writes:

Asked about the interview, Sessions’s spokesperson Sarah Isgur Flores wrote in an email, “As Attorney General, Sessions will prioritize curtailing the threats that rising crime and addiction rates pose to the health and safety of our country and that includes enforcing our existing immigration laws.”

Representative Albert Johnson, a Washington Republican described by the historian Edwin Black as a “fanatic raceologist and eugenicist,” used his stewardship of the immigration committee to ensure that racist pseudoscience provided an “empirical” basis for immigration restriction. Immigration historian Roger Daniels put it even more bluntly, writing in Guarding the Golden Door that Johnson’s “racial theories” would “in slightly different form” become “the official ideology of Nazi Germany.”

When the law passed, its primary Senate author, Rhode Island Senator David A. Reed, expressed relief in The New York Times, writing that “the racial composition of America at the time is thus made permanent.”

Ethnic cleansing watch

Remind yourself

Emergency Rally: Get ICE out of Baltimore

Listening to Mark Halperin earnestly explain how Trump has a mandate for mass deportation, I am appalled at how easily these media types fall into acquiescence with the latest outrage — and how they are willing to use language to distort and normalize this.

  • There was no mandate for ethnic cleansing. People who voted for Trump wanted him to keep terrorists out. As far as I can tell, we don’t have any Mexican or Central American terrorists.
  • This is the longtime philosophy of Bannon and Miller, Trump’s advisors. They are literally white supremacists. I’m not exaggerating.
  • Almost 3 million more people voted to not do this.
  • Most people do not understand that the “criminals” targeted by Trump can be anyone — because just being in the country illegally makes you a criminal. In fact, illegal immigrants have a lower crime rate.
  • This used to be America.

White nationalists

In the White House.

The ideological leader of the Trump movement is Sessions, hailed by Bannon for “developing populist nation-state policies” from his somewhat isolated perch in the Senate. Bannon, who avoids the spotlight, gives away the game in his praise of Sessions. “In America and Europe, working people are reasserting their right to control their own destinies,” he wrote in a recent statement to the Washington Post, blasting the “cosmopolitan elites in the media that live in a handful of our larger cities.” Given the demographics of Trump’s support—given the demographics of Europe—this definition of “working people” can mean only one thing: white people. And “cosmopolitan elites” has a long history as a euphemism for Jews and other minorities.

Go read the whole thing. Horrifying.

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