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Recall for Eggo waffles

Pumpkin Spice Eggo Waffles, Kellogg's, 9/2016, pics by Mike Mozart of TheToyChannel and JeepersMedia on YouTube #Pumpkin #Spice #Eggo #Waffles

Listeria across 25 states:

Kellogg announced Monday that it has voluntarily recalled about 10,000 cases of Eggo waffles in 25 states due to potential listeria contamination.

Listeria can cause serious health issues in children, pregnant women, elderly people and individuals with weakened immune systems. Kellogg said it has not received any reports of illness, but is recalling boxes of frozen waffles out of caution.

Customers who have purchased 10-count boxes of Kellogg’s Eggo Nutri-Grain Whole Wheat Waffles with a UPC code of 3800 40370 and a Best If Used By Date of Nov. 21, 2017, should discard the items immediately. The company is offering refunds for discarded products.

How work can lead to suicide in a globalized economy

businesswoman-stressed-by-laptop-ThinkstockPhoto

By Sarah Waters, University of Leeds and Jenny Chan, University of Oxford

A Paris prosecutor recently called for the former CEO and six senior managers of telecoms provider, France Télécom, to face criminal charges for workplace harassment. The recommendation followed a lengthy inquiry into the suicides of a number of employees at the company between 2005 and 2009. The prosecutor accused management of deliberately “destabilising” employees and creating a “stressful professional climate” through a company-wide strategy of “harcèlement moral” – psychological bullying.

All deny any wrongdoing and it is now up to a judge to decide whether to follow the prosecutor’s advice or dismiss the case. If it goes ahead, it would be a landmark criminal trial, with implications far beyond just one company.

Workplace suicides are sharply on the rise internationally, with increasing numbers of employees choosing to take their own lives in the face of extreme pressures at work. Recent studies in the United States, Australia, Japan, South Korea, China, India and Taiwan all point to a steep rise in suicides in the context of a generalised deterioration in working conditions.

Rising suicides are part of the profound transformations in the workplace that have taken place over the past 30 years. These transformations are arguably rooted in the political and economic shift to globalisation that has radically altered the way we work.

In the post-war Fordist era of industry (pioneered by US car manufacturer Henry Ford), jobs generally provided stability and a clear career trajectory for many, allowing people to define their collective identity and their place in the world. Strong trade unions in major industrial sectors meant that employees could negotiate their working rights and conditions.

But today’s globalised workplace is characterised by job insecurity, intense work, forced redeployments, flexible contracts, worker surveillance, and limited social protection and representation. Zero-hour contracts are the new norm for many in the hospitality and healthcare industries, for example.

Now, it is not enough simply to work hard. In the words of Marxist theorist Franco Berardi, “the soul is put to work” and workers must devote their whole selves to the needs of the company.

For the economist Guy Standing, the precariat is the new social class of the 21st century, characterised by the lack of job security and even basic stability. Workers move in and out of jobs which give little meaning to their lives. This shift has had deleterious effects on many people’s experience of work, with rising cases of acute stress, anxiety, sleep disorders, burnout, hopelessness and, in some cases, suicide.

Holding companies to account

Yet, company bosses are rarely held to account for inflicting such misery on their employees. The suicides at France Télécom preceded another well-publicised case in a large multinational company – Foxconn Technology Group in China – where 18 young migrant workers aged between 17 and 25 attempted suicide at one of Foxconn’s main factories in 2010 (14 of whom died).

The victims all worked on the assembly line making electronic gadgets for some of the world’s richest corporations, including Samsung, Sony and Dell. But it was Apple that received the most criticism, as Foxconn was its main supplier at the time.

Labour rights activists argue that corporations such as Apple and their contracted suppliers should be jointly responsible for creating the working conditions and management pressure that might have triggered workplace suicides. Extensive interviews with one of the Foxconn survivors, a woman called Tian Yu who was 17-years-old when she attempted suicide, detailed a harsh production regime. She said she had to work 12-hour shifts, skipped meals to work overtime and often only had one day off every second week.

Foxconn assembly line.
EPA

Apple published a set of standards for how workers should be treated in the aftermath, but its suppliers continued to be dogged by accusations that these were breached. In December 2014, for example, the BBC ran a documentary called “Apple’s Broken Promises” which showed how the company had failed to improve working conditions four years after the crisis. Undercover filming showed exhausted workers falling asleep on 12-hour shifts and workers being yelled at repeatedly by managers at new supplier, Pegatron Shanghai, where the latest iPhones are assembled.

Pegatron said in response to the BBC investigation that it would investigate the reports and take necessary action if any deficiencies were found in their factories. Apple maintains that it does do all it can to monitor its supplier’s practices with its annual supplier responsibility reports. Meanwhile, labour rights activists and researchers continue to allege abuse of workers in the company’s supply chains.

Writing at the end of the 19th century, French sociologist Emile Durkheim suggested that suicide was a kind of mirror to society that revealed the fundamental nature of the social order at a given historical juncture. France Télécom and Foxconn are at different ends of the globalisation spectrum – one employs white-collar workers in high-tech service occupations and the other recruits young rural migrants to work on the assembly line. Yet suicides in these two places reveal the common face of a global economic order that too often allows profit to take precedence over all else.

Meanwhile it continues to be business as usual for many of the richest multinational corporations in the world. But it’s high time that all corporations across the spectrum took responsibility for their own abuses.

The Conversation

Sarah Waters, Senior Lecturer in French Studies, University of Leeds and Jenny Chan, Departmental Lecturer in Sociology and China Studies, University of Oxford

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Preventing Injuries at An Amusement Park

Amusement parks can be a great source of fun for people of all ages. Millions of people every year attend local county fairs, church homecomings, school festivals and large commercial amusement parks where roller coasters and thrill rides are plentiful. Most people climb aboard these rides and do not question the safety.

However, thousands are injured every year most commonly seeking medical attention for head injuries, broken bones, and back injuries.

When you and your family plan a fun outing to an amusement park, you are most likely not anticipating anyone getting hurt. You simply trust that the rides are in good working order and the staff is properly trained in operating the rides and providing for your safety. However, stories like this show that accidents can and do happen.
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Scientists rename thyroid tumor, say cancer is overdiagnosed

All About Papillary Thyroid Cancer Remedy And Treatments

The overdiagnosis of thyroid cancer has been an ongoing and steadily escalating issue over the past few decades. In 1992, six out of every 100,000 Americans were diagnosed with thyroid cancer. In 2012, that number was two-and-a-half times higher, at 15. Despite the increase in diagnoses, however, the rate of people who have died of thyroid… Continue Reading →

Should you check procedure rates before going to the hospital?

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This is about Maryland hospitals, but the information applies everywhere. For instance, hospitals now break a lot of costs out separately that used to be bundled and covered by your insurance:

Despite having state-wide cost-control measures in place, not all medical procedures at Maryland hospitals are treated equally. With the increase cost of deductibles and co-pays, people have started to shop around for hospitals that offer cheaper procedures.

Unfortunately for many of those in Maryland, hospitals do not make it easy for people to obtain answers regarding the cost of certain procedures. Even though the State of Maryland has control over how much hospitals can charge, people still find it difficult to get information about the cost of treatment. This lack of information makes it difficult for people who need to comparison shop for cheaper hospitals because of the rising deductibles.

The rise in comparison shopping begs the question of why prices vary so greatly at different Maryland hospitals. In some Maryland hospitals, the price of certain procedures is more than twice as much than at other Maryland hospitals. For instance, at the University of Maryland St. Joseph Medical Center, the price of having a baby is $4,895, while at Johns Hopkins Hospital, the cost averages at about $11,752.

However, when hospitals cite these averages, they often do not take into account the cost of complications, as well as certain lab tests. Since every patient is different and every procedure is different, can a person really shop around when considering different procedures?

Maryland officials who help determine the price of procedures at different hospitals insist that the differing prices are not based on the quality of service, but on the types of procedures offered and the number of patients who can afford to pay for the procedures.

Thus, a procedure at one hospital may be greater because Maryland allows the hospitals to increase the price of procedures to make up for the inability of certain patients to pay. This often means that hospitals in wealthier communities generally have lower prices.
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I must be getting old…

Common probate issues which a probate attorney can rescue you from

Because I find myself reading estate tax articles I used to skip:

As another generation of Americans begin aging into their golden years, the realities of passing along what they have earned throughout their lives to their children becomes a high priority. For a large number of people, that means making annual contributions to an IRA. But what many fail to realize is that when it comes to estate taxes, a person’s IRA is viewed as a part of the person’s taxable estate.

In a case where a taxable estate is greater than the federal and state exclusion amount, a person will have to pay estate taxes. For instance, if the taxable estate was greater than $5.43 million in 2015, the federal rate could be up to 40%. Since estates are set up on a per-person basis, a married couple may be able to plan to maximize the use of the exemption, providing coverage for over $10 million of the couple’s assets.

However, when a person is aware that they are in poor health and have an IRA with a great deal of money, an estate attorney may suggest a “deathbed Roth conversion.” A Roth IRA is a retirement account that allows people to pay taxes on the money going into the account rather than when they take the money out of the account. A conversion allows a person with an IRA to convert it to a Roth IRA before death as a means to pay the income taxes up front and to reduce the size of their estate.

In many cases, this deathbed conversion strategy is generally unnecessary since IRD exists which is meant to get rid of any need for an IRA conversion. IRD or Income in Respect of a Decedent tax allows for IRA beneficiaries a tax deduction for estate taxes paid by the original owner of the IRA. While IRD deductions are meant to protect beneficiaries from federal estate taxes, deathbed conversions can be beneficial for state estate taxes.

According to Trust and Estates Attorney Kerri Castellini, “Many people are surprised when a loved one dies as to how much of their estate is subject to taxes and it can be quite a shock. It is important that they understand all the options open to them, so that planning for estate taxes can occur prior to death.”

A person will need to consider the best timing and strategy to ensure that the person is able to achieve the lowest tax rate. When planning an estate, it is essential that a person do what is legally necessary to pay as many taxes before his or her death to minimize the size of the estate.

I don’t really have any money, and I doubt I ever will. But you never know!

More news you can use

The last will and testament for this year... Hopefully next year's chapter would better than this year. Regardless the way they underestimate me for the sake of my pupils... I gulp. Next year, I'll show my true colours...   #sklmaxx

If I were the kind of person who actually had an IRA, this would be useful. You might be someone who does find it useful:

As another generation of Americans begin aging into their golden years, the realities of passing along what they have earned throughout their lives to their children becomes a high priority. For a large number of people, that means making annual contributions to an IRA. But what many fail to realize is that when it comes to estate taxes, a person’s IRA is viewed as a part of the person’s taxable estate.

In a case where a taxable estate is greater than the federal and state exclusion amount, a person will have to pay estate taxes. For instance, if the taxable estate was greater than $5.43 million in 2015, the federal rate could be up to 40%. Since estates are set up on a per-person basis, a married couple may be able to plan to maximize the use of the exemption, providing coverage for over $10 million of the couple’s assets.

However, when a person is aware that they are in poor health and have an IRA with a great deal of money, an estate attorney may suggest a “deathbed Roth conversion.” A Roth IRA is a retirement account that allows people to pay taxes on the money going into the account rather than when they take the money out of the account. A conversion allows a person with an IRA to convert it to a Roth IRA before death as a means to pay the income taxes up front and to reduce the size of their estate.

In many cases, this deathbed conversion strategy is generally unnecessary since IRD exists which is meant to get rid of any need for an IRA conversion. IRD or Income in Respect of a Decedent tax allows for IRA beneficiaries a tax deduction for estate taxes paid by the original owner of the IRA. While IRD deductions are meant to protect beneficiaries from federal estate taxes, deathbed conversions can be beneficial for state estate taxes.

According to Trust and Estates Attorney Kerri Castellini, “Many people are surprised when a loved one dies as to how much of their estate is subject to taxes and it can be quite a shock. It is important that they understand all the options open to them, so that planning for estate taxes can occur prior to death.”

A person will need to consider the best timing and strategy to ensure that the person is able to achieve the lowest tax rate. When planning an estate, it is essential that a person do what is legally necessary to pay as many taxes before his or her death to minimize the size of the estate.

If you’re shopping for a foodie

ISH

I got to taste this incredible citrus horseradish this weekend, and it’s better than crack. They only sell it by the 6-pack (I found one place that sells singles but they’re out of stock), no way can I justify the expense. But if you know someone who would really, really like something like this, I highly recommend it!

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