Archive | War Crimes

‘Unfathomable pain and suffering’ in Yemen

Yemen registra más de 300 mil casos sospechosos de cólera y 1.700 muertos https://t.co/xBMnJVGKeC #acn https://t.co/HebVtUXm48 July 10, 2017 at 02:14PM

United Nations officials have warned that the conflict in the Arab world’s poorest nation is intensifying daily, with armed groups expanding, thousands facing the cholera epidemic, and seven million “on the cusp of famine”. Speaking before the UN Security Council on Wednesday, Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed, UN special envoy to Yemen, called on all parties “to… Continue Reading →

Drip drip drip

So Trump lawyer Michael Cohen, who was asked to testify before Congress and refused, hand-delivered a “peace” plan for Russia and Ukraine to former national security adviser Michael Flynn before Flynn was asked to resign, the New York Times reported on Sunday.

The Times said the plan was pushed by Cohen — a close confidante of Trump who served as his organization’s special counsel from 2007 to 2017 and now serves as Trump’s personal lawyer — and Felix Sater, a Russian-American real-estate developer who has helped the Trump Organization scout deals in Russia.

Ukrainian lawmaker Andrii V. Artemenko, who met with Trump’s campaign team during the election , was also involved in drafting the proposal. Artemenko told the Times he had evidence of Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko’s corruption that could lead to his ouster.

I have no idea if Trump’s big “peace” plan has changed, but back in the ’80s, he pushed the idea that if the U.S. and Russia joined forces to nuke one country, it would make everyone else willing to give up nuclear weapons.

Yeah, except for the nuke part, you know?

What is moral injury in veterans?

DSC_1424-1  ~ 5/22/17 ~ DAY 303/365 ~ YEAR 2 ~ Day 667 ~ PHOTO A DAY ~ 365 A Day CHALLENGE ~ DAY 22 MAY 2017 CHALLENGE ~  "MUSIC" ~s=”rhexcerpt”>By Holly Arrow, Director, Groups and War Lab, University of Oregon and William M. Schumacher, Clinical Psychology Doctoral Candidate, University of Oregon. What is moral injury? Truthout.org, CC BY-NC-SA On Memorial Day, Americans remember those who died while in service to the country. In the past five years, a large proportion of these deaths have been… Continue Reading →

We just dropped largest non-nuke bomb on Afghanistan

800px-MOAB_bomb

We’re told ISIS was building some tunnels along the Afghanistan-Pakistan border, which means they needed to drop a BOMB on them. Not just a bomb, but the biggest bomb in our arsenal, a bomb capable of blasting debris in a one-mile radius. The bomb, nicknamed MOAB (Mother of All Bombs), was developed but not used in… Continue Reading →

Report: Bush ignored numerous warnings before invasion

Chilcot Inquiry Rally (6.7.16) (163)

The dirty hippies were right again. I’m sure none of us are surprised, exactly, but it’s still shocking to see it all laid out:

Last week, the independent British committee established to delve into the blunders that led to that country joining the Iraq misadventure released a report astonishing for its breadth and sobriety. It is no easy read—with 2.6 million words in 12 volumes, it explores every detail of the processes and decisions that cost the lives of 179 British servicemen and women. And since the goal of the inquiry was to determine what went wrong across the board, it provides information no Republican politician would allow anyone on Capitol Hill to dig up.

The report’s shocking conclusion is obvious: The White House, the Pentagon and, to a lesser extent, the State Department had no idea what they were doing.

Incompetence permeates the tale, with Bush officials arrogantly waving aside warnings and pleas for better planning. The march toward war took on an unstoppable political momentum as evidence piled up that this invasion would be a colossal catastrophe. Preconceptions—such as blithe dismissals of a humanitarian and governmental role in the invasion for the United Nations, as well as a disregard for day-after-war preparations in favor of gut feelings and slogans—undermined the chance for success. Records show the British considered themselves indispensable to the effort, if only to counter the Bush administration’s reckless planning, which officials in Prime Minister Tony Blair’s government derided as fantastical.

If you have the stomach for it, go read the rest.

The irradiated nightmare we left behind

This post originally appeared in The Washington Spectator. When the United States revealed in January that it is testing a more nimble, more precise version of its B61 atom bomb, some were immediately alarmed. General James Cartwright, a former strategist for President Obama, warned that “going smaller” could make nuclear weapons “more thinkable” and “more usable.”… Continue Reading →

Some good news

Syria refugee crisis

Thank God! I am happy to hear this:

MUNICH — The United States, Russia and other powers have reached agreement on a “cessation of hostilities” in Syria’s civil war that allows for immediate humanitarian access to besieged areas, Secretary of State John F. Kerry announced here early Friday morning.

The end of hostilities, which Kerry avoided calling a cease-fire, is scheduled to go into effect “in one week’s time,” Kerry said. Humanitarian access to towns and cities in Syria where food and medical supplies have been blocked, sometimes for months, is to begin immediately.

“It was unanimous,” Kerry said. “Everybody today agreed on the urgency of humanitarian access. What we have here are words on paper. What we need to see in the next few days are actions on the ground.”

Agreement came after day-long consultations that lasted until early Friday here. Hours earlier, Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov huddled with his counterpart from Iran, Russia’s ally in backing the Syrian government of President Bashar al-Assad, and Secretary of State John F. Kerry sat down with allies backing the Syrian opposition, before all parties gathered for a joint meeting at which the deal was struck.

Lavrov called cessation of hostilities the “first step” toward a full cease-fire.

The effort has been considered a last chance to stop the carnage in Syria that has left hundreds of thousands dead and sent millions fleeing from the country. What was already a desperate situation in Syria has greatly worsened over the past few weeks, as massive Russian bombardment in and around the city of Aleppo has scattered opposition fighters and driven tens of thousands of civilians toward the barricaded Turkish border.

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