Warnings from a high school teacher

Wow:

You are a college professor.


I have just retired as a high school teacher.


I have some bad news for you. In case you do not already see what is happening, I want to warn you of what to expect from the students who will be arriving in your classroom, even if you teach in a highly selective institution.


No Child Left Behind went into effect for the 2002–03 academic year, which means that America’s public schools have been operating under the pressures and constrictions imposed by that law for a decade. Since the testing requirements were imposed beginning in third grade, the students arriving in your institution have been subject to the full extent of the law’s requirements. While it is true that the US Department of Education is now issuing waivers on some of the provisions of the law to certain states, those states must agree to other provisions that will have as deleterious an effect on real student learning as did No Child Left Behind—we have already seen that in public schools, most notably in high schools.


My primary course as a teacher was government, and for the last seven years that included three or four (out of six) sections of Advanced Placement (AP) US Government and Politics. My students, mostly tenth-graders, were quite bright, but already I was seeing the impact of federal education policy on their learning and skills.


In many cases, students would arrive in our high school without having had meaningful social studies instruction, because even in states that tested social studies or science, the tests did not count for “adequate yearly progress” under No Child Left Behind. With test scores serving as the primary if not the sole measure of student performance and, increasingly, teacher evaluation, anything not being tested was given short shrift.


Further, most of the tests being used consist primarily or solely of multiple-choice items, which are cheaper to develop, administer, and score than are tests that include constructed responses such as essays. Even when a state has tests that include writing, the level of writing required for such tests often does not demand that higher-level thinking be demonstrated, nor does it require proper grammar, usage, syntax, and structure. Thus, students arriving in our high school lacked experience and knowledge about how to do the kinds of writing that are expected at higher levels of education.


Recognizing this, those of us in public schools do what we can to work on those higher-order skills, but we are limited. Remember, high schools also have tests—No Child Left Behind and its progeny (such as Race to the Top) require testing at least once in high school in reading and math. In Maryland, where I taught, those tests were the state’s High School Assessments in tenth-grade English and algebra (which some of our more gifted pupils had taken as early as eighth grade). High schools are also forced to focus on preparing students for tests, and that leads to a narrowing of what we can accomplish in our classrooms.

4 Responses to Warnings from a high school teacher

  1. tsisageya January 16, 2013 at 8:53 pm #

    Obviously, you all don’t know about the method to teach subtraction in the 3rd grade in public schools. It’s very bad.

    Look it up. WTF is up with this bullshit? And do NOT offer me any mansplaining, k?

  2. tsisageya January 16, 2013 at 8:58 pm #

    Dicks Are Useless Here.

    I attribute it to No Child Left Behind aka Let’s make our kids as big a dumbass as dubya/obama.

  3. tsisageya January 16, 2013 at 9:00 pm #

    I see ashes in my delightful future.

  4. tsisageya January 16, 2013 at 9:09 pm #

    Hey, if you want a modern religion, think: White Buffalo Calf Woman

    She likes ashes too.

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