The Cost Of A Life

While politicians play games, people live with the economic fallout:

In 2009 and 2010, as the economic collapse shuddered across the globe, oncologists in California noticed a troubling trend: Three patients who had had serious tumors under control for as long as eight years reappeared in the clinic with massive cancer regrowth which, in one case, required emergency surgery. In retrospect, this downturn in fortunes should have been predictable: The economic recession had forced the patients to discontinue a life-extending medication.

“In all three cases, the patients developed new symptoms and came in after having missed an appointment or two without us knowing that they had stopped the drug,” said Dr. Katie Kelley, co-author of a letter-to-the-editor in the Aug. 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, which describes the cases. Kelley is also assistant clinical professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

And there have been other such cases, both at UCSF and around the nation, either of patients stopping medications altogether or rationing in the hopes of making precious supplies last longer.

“Certainly we’ve seen an increase in affordability concerns,” said Stephen Finan, senior policy director of the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network in Washington, D.C. “Very definitely we’ve seen an upward trend in the last couple of years of people struggling with deductibles and cost sharing.”

2 thoughts on “The Cost Of A Life

  1. “Then let them die,” said Scrooge, “and decrease the excess population!”

    Our modern elites.

  2. The whole purpose of deductibles and co-payments is to reduce excessive use of medical services, reduce demand and lower prices. Seems like here the system is working as planned. What is the problem?

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