Working for Amazon

7. On regret, Jeff Bezos (Billionaire)  The founder of Amazon says, "I knew that if I failed I wouldn't regret that, but I knew the one thing I might regret is not trying." Failure can be a scary notion, but what if you succeed? Amazon was up and running

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Bo Olson was one of them. He lasted less than two years in a book marketing role and said that his enduring image was watching people weep in the office, a sight other workers described as well. “You walk out of a conference room and you’ll see a grown man covering his face,” he said. “Nearly every person I worked with, I saw cry at their desk.”

And:

In 2013, Elizabeth Willet, a former Army captain who served in Iraq, joined Amazon to manage housewares vendors and was thrilled to find that a large company could feel so energetic and entrepreneurial. After she had a child, she arranged with her boss to be in the office from 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. each day, pick up her baby and often return to her laptop later. Her boss assured her things were going well, but her colleagues, who did not see how early she arrived, sent him negative feedback accusing her of leaving too soon.

“I can’t stand here and defend you if your peers are saying you’re not doing your work,” she says he told her. She left the company after a little more than a year.

Ms. Willet’s co-workers strafed her through the Anytime Feedback Tool, the widget in the company directory that allows employees to send praise or criticism about colleagues to management. (While bosses know who sends the comments, their identities are not typically shared with the subjects of the remarks.) Because team members are ranked, and those at the bottom eliminated every year, it is in everyone’s interest to outperform everyone else.

And:

Many women at Amazon attribute its gender gap — unlike Facebook, Google or Walmart, it does not currently have a single woman on its top leadership team — to its competition-and-elimination system. Several former high-level female executives, and other women participating in a recent internal Amazon online discussion that was shared with The New York Times, said they believed that some of the leadership principles worked to their disadvantage. They said they could lose out in promotions because of intangible criteria like “earn trust” (principle No. 10) or the emphasis on disagreeing with colleagues. Being too forceful, they said, can be particularly hazardous for women in the workplace.

Motherhood can also be a liability. Michelle Williamson, a 41-year-old parent of three who helped build Amazon’s restaurant supply business, said her boss, Shahrul Ladue, had told her that raising children would most likely prevent her from success at a higher level because of the long hours required. Mr. Ladue, who confirmed her account, said that Ms. Williamson had been directly competing with younger colleagues with fewer commitments, so he suggested she find a less demanding job at Amazon. (Both he and Ms. Williamson left the company.)

He added that he usually worked 85 or more hours a week and rarely took a vacation.

5 thoughts on “Working for Amazon

  1. Be careful driving by the campus at S. Lake Union as well; the Amazombies are known to step off a curb in front of you with their faces glued to a mobile device. On the bright side, the outflow of talented people from Amazon has been great for other tech companies who only demand 10-12 hours per day.

  2. Any suggestions for an Amazon replacement? I like to vote with my wallet against companies who abuse their employees. I’ve also suggested an investigation into the abusive labor practices of such companies to my congressionals.

  3. Spying, anonymous informants, required self-criticism sessions,termination by innuendo. Sounds a lot like working for Stalin.

  4. This article is about Amazon’s actual employees. The people who do the actual work of fulfilling our orders are treated even worse, since they are usually hired by 3rd party staffing companies.

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