Archive | June, 2011


I just came back from the public pool and what was supposed to be a water aerobics class. “The city told us we’re not allowed to segregate the hours by age anymore,” the lifeguard told me. “My boss is trying to get an exemption to see if we can reinstate the class.”

So instead I walked up and down the pool for a half-hour. Better than nothing, right? And it felt good to move my ankle without weight on it.


A semi-truck stuffed with petitions delivered nearly 1.3 million signatures to the Ohio Secretary of State on June 29 in order to put union busting SB5 up for a citizen’s veto. Thousands of Ohioans marched through the streets of the capitol in the People’s Parade to deliver the signatures, which were over five times the number needed to get the bill on the ballot for a public referendum.

Mine’s bigger

Sure, why not? It’s not as if there’s real people on the other end of those numbers:

Senate Budget Committee Chairman Kent Conrad (D-N.D.) announced Wednesday that Democrats had finally reached an agreement on a budget plan.

His announcement came as the leadership met with President Obama to inform him that their members had unified around a message for the debt-limit showdown.

Conrad’s proposal, which he said he plans to introduce as soon as next week, would cut more than $4 trillion from the deficit, a greater reduction than what Obama’s fiscal commission had recommended.
“We’ve reached an agreement after weeks of work,” Conrad told The Hill on Wednesday afternoon. “I think it’s big.”

The wageless, profitable recovery

No wonder everyone in the Beltway is so baffled. Things are just fine for them!

Economists at Northeastern University have found that the current economic recovery in the United States has been unusually skewed in favor of corporate profits and against increased wages for workers.

In their newly released study, the Northeastern economists found that since the recovery began in June 2009 following a deep 18-month recession, “corporate profits captured 88 percent of the growth in real national income while aggregate wages and salaries accounted for only slightly more than 1 percent” of that growth.

The study, “The ‘Jobless and Wageless Recovery’ From the Great Recession of 2007-2009,” said it was “unprecedented” for American workers to receive such a tiny share of national income growth during a recovery.

According to the study, between the second quarter of 2009, when the recovery began, and the fourth quarter of 2010, national income rose by $528 billion, with $464 billion of that growth going to pretax corporate profits, while just $7 billion went to aggregate wages and salaries, after accounting for inflation.

Maybe we need to deregulate them some more to jumpstart the economy, huh?

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