How Hostess screwed the workers

As usual, the corporate media is leaving out the pertinent parts — like how they stole the workers’ pensions:

In 2005 it was another contract year and this time there was no way out of concessions. The Union negotiated a deal that would save the company $150 million a year in labor. It was a tough internal battle to get people to vote for it. We turned it down twice. Finally the Union told us it was in our best interest and something had to give. So many of us, including myself, changed our votes and took the offer. Remember that next time you see CEO Rayburn on tv stating that we haven’t sacrificed for this company. The company then emerged from bankruptcy. In 2005 before concessions I made $48,000, last year I made $34,000. My pay changed dramatically but at least I was still contributing to my self-funded pension.

In July of 2011 we received a letter from the company. It said that the $3+ per hour that we as a Union contribute to the pension was going to be ‘borrowed’ by the company until they could be profitable again. Then they would pay it all back. The Union was notified of this the same time and method as the individual members. No contact from the company to the Union on a national level.

This money will never be paid back. The company filed for bankruptcy and the judge ruled that the $3+ per hour was a debt the company couldn’t repay. The Union continued to work despite this theft of our self-funded pension contributions for over a year. I consider this money stolen. No other word in the English language describes what they have done to this money.

After securing our hourly cash from the bankruptcy judge they set out on getting approval to force a new contract on us. They had already refused to negotiate outside of court. They received approval from the judge to impose the contract then turned it over to the Union for a vote. You read that right, they got it approved by the judge before ever showing to the Union.

What was this last/best/final offer? You’d never know by watching the main stream media tell the story. So here you go…
1) 8% hourly pay cut in year 1 with additional cuts totaling 27% over 5 years. Currently, I make $16.12 an hour at TOP rate of pay in the bakery. I would drop to $11.26 in 5 years.
2) They get to keep our $3+ an hour forever.
3) Doubling of weekly insurance premium.
4) Lowering of overall quality of insurance plan.
5) TOTAL withdrawal from ALL pensions. If you don’t have it now then you never will.

Remember how I said I made $48,000 in 2005 and $34,000 last year? I would make $25,000 in 5 years if I took their offer.

It will be hard to replace the job I had, but it will be easy to replace the job they were trying to give me. That $3+ per hour they steal totaled $50 million last year that they never paid us. They sold $2.5 BILLION in product last year. If they can’t make this profitable without stealing my money then good riddance.

I keep hearing how this strike forced them to liquidate. How we should just take it and be glad to have a job. What an unpatriotic view point. The reason these jobs provided me with a middle class opportunity is because people like my father in law and his father fought for my Union rights. I received that pay and those benefits because previous Union members fought for them. I won’t sell them, or my coworkers, out.

We may have forced the companies hand but they were going to smack us with it anyway.

3 Responses to How Hostess screwed the workers

  1. jawbone November 19, 2012 at 2:33 pm #

    Atrios said Hostess was Bained — but he didn’t offer links. I meant to do some digging, but got involved in all the RL stuff cramming into my brain.

    Thanks for the background.

  2. jawbone November 19, 2012 at 2:34 pm #

    I know from a friend whose husband went through it that this was done by Evinrude to its workers, via the takeover artistes who screwed them out of their pensions. Wages cut, then the pension account just…vanished.

  3. cgeye November 21, 2012 at 5:36 am #

    It’s an old game, as old as the Mergers & Acquistions tactic of saying a sold company’s assets were so wack that the pension fund could not be sustained, and must be liquidated, to pay debts.

    They’re so good at this, and now so cynical, that when the truth of their theft is easily found, they still get the headlines in their favor.

Site Meter