The new precariat

Finally, a place where I belong!

During the Presidential campaign, Americans have heard endless discussions about unemployment. But neither candidate has said much, at least not directly, about precarious employment or about the new precariat – that growing group (some would even say the growing class) of workers in temporary, part-time, and/or contingent work that often doesn’t pay a living wage.


Who is the precariat? According to Guy Standing, the author of The Precariat: the New Dangerous Class, all of us could be. For now, the precariat involves largely women, the young, the disabled, retirees forced back to work, former prisoners, and migrants. It also includes large numbers of formerly middle-class professionals, skilled and semi-skilled people who have been displaced by economic change. While each of these groups has gotten some attention, Standing argues that as a group, the precariat is still “a class in the making,” united by an overwhelming sense of insecurity and vulnerability.


[…] Just how big is the new precariat? It’s difficult to measure, but the Federal Reserve Board of Cleveland suggests that the ‘Great Recession’ has resulted in increases in self-employment, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that 35 million people work part time. While the data on how many people have precarious employment is far from definitive, the precariat clearly seems to be large and growing.


That suggests that the new precariat could have a significant impact on the election. Most of them don’t believe that the government or other institutions can do much to ameliorate their situation. Many consider themselves to be small business people. As Arun Gupta and Michelle Fawcett have suggested, “Republicans have turned small business into a catch-all group the way ‘working class’ once served that function for the left.” That suggests that the precariat may be persuaded by campaign rhetoric about taxes and economic development. On the other hand, many see themselves as anti-capitalist, committed to green values and social justice. So will they vote like those who share their educational backgrounds, who are more likely to be politically independent and have socially progressive leanings, thus revealing themselves to be the fallen faction of the middle class? Or do they, like much of the old white working class, vote on the basis of economic aspiration? Or does the precariat now include so many Americans, from diverse backgrounds and in varied situations, that their political views can’t be easily predicted? In 2012 in states like Ohio, the new precariat could determine the presidential election and America’s future.

One Response to The new precariat

  1. lless October 23, 2012 at 9:08 pm #

    This is a very dangerous trend because it will vent in the social jealousy of lost standing and be cancerous to job security, benefits, and retirement programs. Instead of looking up in the direction of the cause, they fixate downward. The empathy challenged are the new emergent majority in our political process and both parties are actively courting them.

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