For each death, a hole in the world

This is something I wrote for Memorial Day 2005 and I run it every year:

Soldiers are not chunks of identical clay; each of them has a story, their own reasons for being caught in a war.


Brave? Maybe – sometimes, under some conditions. Scared, mostly. The younger they are, the more likely their presence had to do with restlessness, cockiness. The need to be part of a winning team, the desire to even a score. Kick ass, take names. Kill them all, let God sort them out.


The older they are, the more realistic they are. This was a steady paycheck, or a way to supplement the one they already had. When they join, it’s with their eyes on the future benefit. When they’re in the middle of a war, they think only of surviving the next five minutes. Please, God, please. Let me see my family again.


And when they die in the war, each death leaves a hole in the world. It’s important to remember that, to not see them as a monolithic casualty list or as an acceptable loss.


No loss is acceptable. Ask the parents, the spouses, the children. They try. They tell themselves stories of nobility, sacrifice, a greater cause. They cover it up with the ritual rhetoric. But deep down, they must wonder.






















Here is how to count the cost: In high school graduation pictures that will never be replaced with wedding pictures. In wedding rings that will never be worn smooth by years. By the daughters who will walk down the aisle with an uncle or brother instead of Dad. By the sons who will find themselves angry and lost, not understanding why. The children who will hear about their mother’s eyes, their father’s chin but won’t ever see themselves reflected in that face.


By the parents who now understand the quiet obscenity of outliving their own children.


Each and every one of these deaths left a hole in the world. That is why we count them.


They mattered.

Test results

The endocrinologist says my TSH level is still high, but lower than it was. So I’ll be on a trial run of synthetic thyroid, even though he says it’s “unlikely” that I’m going to actually feel better. The main purpose in treating it, he says, is for all the other problems low thyroid can cause, like cardiac problems. Whatever.

Tradition!

The older I get, the less patience I have with the intricate traditions of patriarchal religions. You want to tie yourself in knots over minutiae because you believe in a God that requires it? Well, I guess you have no other choice. Other than owning your own life and creating your own relationship with the universe, I mean.

Comcastic

I am supposed to believe there is such a thing as real competition in this country. I just got off the phone with Comcast, telling them I wanted only the bare minimum of services, reduced from what I currently have.

I keep going through this exercise, and I keep forgetting how Kafkaesque the whole thing is: By cutting off premium and HD channels, I can save (wait for it) $1.89 a month. Wow.

No one ever believes me when I tell them, either. Comcast just threw in a $15 a month credit and free HBO and Showtime if I keep the same service for $2 more. This is some crazy shit.

UPDATE: Hello to all the visitors from Shakesville. I’m really enjoying your comments on this.

Fracking East Alabama

Fracking may be coming to East Alabama in the hills of the Talladega National Forest.

On June 14th the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will sell leases for approximately 43,000 acres in the Talladega National Forest in eastern Alabama for oil and gas extraction after being approached by an unknown drilling company. Interest in the area appears to be on shale gas in the Black Warrior Shale Basin beneath Talladega National Forest. Some of the wells may use fracking as a method to release gas deposits.

There are quite a few citizens and officials that are very concerned about it. There was meeting at the Ritz Theater in Talladega, AL on Monday this week to discuss these concerns. One was the lack of notification by the BLM. U.S. Congressman Mike Rogers (R- Saks AL) has asked the BLM to delay proceeding with the sale so the public may review the proposals. He had stated that the BLM did not properly notify officials in the area of the proposed sales. Francine Hutchinson, a local biology instructor and naturalist, said she keeps up with news on the Talladega National Forest on line and stated she was unaware of the announcement and the comment period that ended April 19th. Calhoun County Commissioner Tim Hodges who represents the area didn’t even know about the proposed leases until near the end of the comment period.

Rep. Randy Wood, R-Saks, said he was opposed to oil and gas drilling in the forest and was caught off-guard recently when he learned that the process was moving forward so swiftly.

“I’m all for drilling,” Wood said. “But there are plenty of places for drilling without drilling in the forest.”

On behalf of environmental groups Wild South and Natural Resources Defense Council, the Southern Environmental Law Center was able to send a letter of protest before the April 19 deadline. The protest states the impact study used for the proposal of the leases from 2004 is outdated and new studies need to include the impact should fracking be used as a method of extraction.

“The Bureau of Land Management is proposing a massive intrusion into Alabama’s national forests without properly analyzing the potential impacts and without providing sufficient information to the public.  Some of the areas they propose leasing for oil and gas development are near some of the most popular destinations in the forests,” said Keith Johnston, managing attorney for the Birmingham office of the Southern Environmental Law Center.

John Stephens, a retired local geologist, at Monday’s meeting in Talladega was concerned about possible outcomes from fracking to the aquifers of the area.

“Fracking is a frightful thing for our communities,” he said. “Holes in (Mt.) Cheaha may come out in Sylacauga, or in Montgomery. Four to six million gallons of water, sand and chemicals will be used in each well, and those chemicals are going to eventually surface somewhere.

There has been no comment from the BLM regarding the sale of the leases and the details of the plan for the leases will not be made public until after the sale.

 

Payback

She is a bitch!

Trent Franks, the Arizona Republican who proposed a 20-week abortion ban in Washington, DC and then barred DC’s pro-choice female delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton from speaking out against the measure has a new problem on his hands: a flood of DC residents who are bringing their municipal complaints directly to the Congressman, who they’re calling “Mayor.” From potholes to rodent problems to public transportation complaints, DC residents have followed Franks’ lead and begun funneling their problems to him rather than the city’s own government. Well played, smartasses. Well fucking played.


The protest was a cooperative effort between Planned Parenthood of Metropolitan Washington DC and a group called DC Vote, which aims to secure representation for DC in Congress. Today, about 50 DC residents eagerly waited outside of Rep. Franks’ door, ready to let “Mayor Franks” know how he could make his newly claimed city better. According to the Huffington Post‘sLaura Bassett, some carried plastic rats, some toted pictures of the potholes they wanted Mayor Franks to fill, and some brought disputed parking tickets.


But not everyone got the chance for face time with Mayor Franks, the Arizonan who just sorta declared himself King of DC’s D&C’s. One put-out resident explained his complaint,

My issue today is metro — full funding for metro. As a constituent here, I use metro all the time, my children use it, and it’s really disgraceful the condition they’ve allowed metro to get to. I have to say I’m very disappointed today. I really wanted to meet my representative, Mr. Franks. He’s supposed to be representing us and I did take some time to come in here today, so I hope he takes these concerns into account.


When confronted on the absurdity of a man from Arizona trying to legislate the rights of women in DC, Franks explained that it wasn’t about Arizona, or DC, or women. It’s about “the pain of the fetus.”

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