Finally, someone in the church hierarchy is held accountable:

(Reuters) – A monsignor who oversaw hundreds of priests in the Philadelphia Archdiocese was found guilty on Friday of one count of endangering the welfare of a child, making him the first senior U.S. Roman Catholic Church official to be convicted for covering up child sex abuse.

The jury acquitted Monsignor William Lynn on two other counts – conspiracy and another charge of child endangerment -after 10 weeks of testimony in a trial that raised questions about personal responsibility and institutional constraints within the church hierarchy.

Removing his black clerical jacket but leaving on his collar, a stoic Lynn, 61, was led out of the courtroom and into custody by deputy sheriffs as his family members wept.

“Every juror there wanted to do justice. … We wanted to do what was right,” jury foreman Isa Logan, 35, a bank customer service representative, told reporters outside the courtroom.

Sentencing for Lynn, who faces up to seven years in prison, was set for August 13 by Judge M. Teresa Sarmina.

“This is a monumental victory for the named and un-named victims,” said Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams. “This was about evil men who did evil things to children.”

While the district attorney’s office argued that Lynn should immediately be jailed, the judge said she would consider house arrest if the defense asked for it.

The jury deliberated 13 days before reaching the mixed decision in the trial of Lynn, who, prosecutors charged, covered up child sex abuse allegations, often by transferring priests to unsuspecting parishes.

Lawyers for Lynn said they planned to appeal the case.

“He’s really upset,” said one of his attorneys, Jeff Lindy. “He’s upset, he’s crushed. He didn’t want anything other than to help kids, he’s crushed about this.”

Barbara Dorris, outreach director for Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, said the verdict put the Church on notice that it can no longer “shield and protect” abusive priests and expect to get away with it.

“This is a strong message, and we’re grateful for that message that kids’ safety has to come first,” she said.

Sandusky guilty

It was highly unlikely that he was going to be acquitted, but it’s a relief that it’s over. (It was a little weird for me to watch the news coverage – the last time I saw top prosecutor Joe McGettigan, I was in high school and he was the surfer-dude big brother of my best friend. Now he looks exactly like his father did then, and that means I must be old. But I digress.) I hope that Penn State’s administrators have enough conscience to revamp their system to prevent such institutional blindness again. But weighing the well-being of children against a powerhouse football team that was a money magnet? They didn’t have a chance until this story finally broke out into the open:

(Reuters) – A jury found former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky guilty on 45 out of 48 counts in his child sex abuse trial on Friday.

Sandusky was seen escorted out of the courthouse in handcuffs. He could be sentenced to hundreds of years in prison.

The decision came after about 21 hours of deliberation over two days by a jury of seven women and five men. Nine of the 16 jurors and alternates had ties to Pennsylvania State University, and the final days of the trial drew large crowds to the Centre County Courthouse.

A large crowd gathered outside the Centre County Courthouse in central Pennsylvania to learn news of the decision. A cheer went up outside as the news was released.

The white-haired former coach faced 48 counts of sexual abuse of 10 boys over a 15-year period, sometimes at Penn State facilities.

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