Breaking us in two

I met Joe Jackson more than 20 years ago, when he was performing at Pulsations, a dreadful nightclub in Philly’s far suburbs. One of the tallest people I’ve ever met who wasn’t a pro basketball player:

Christie wrong again

A lot of people really like Christie, so it’s important that we keep pointing out how wrong he usually is, and what it’s done to New Jersey’s economy:

David Rosen maintained his familiar poker face as he listened quietly last week when the state treasurer formally admitted what most in the State House had long concluded: Governor Christie’s pie-in-the-sky revenue estimates had crashed back to earth.

“At this point, we anticipate we’ll be short about $407 million,” said Treasurer Andrew Sidamon-Eristoff when pressed by reporters during a briefing last week.

It was just one of hundreds of numbers Sidamon-Eristoff rattled off in a briefing equivalent of speed-dating. But this was an important number for Rosen and his staff at the Office of Legislative Services, the research arm of the Legislature. It was validation for Rosen. It was the never-say-you’re-wrong Christie administration effectively saying that it was wrong.

For Rosen, whom Christie publicly slammed as a ghoulish “Dr. Kevorkian of numbers” whose reckless forecasts had been used to justify earlier spending sprees, the treasurer’s comment also meant that his prediction for the current fiscal year 2013 was more accurate. It meant that Rosen and OLS was a lot less wrong than the Christie administration.

Rosen kept the same unflappable demeanor when I approached him Monday shortly before a Senate hearing. All he would say was that he was “gratified” that the OLS report was “quite close this year.” He was diplomatically careful, like his testimony and reports that are carefully scrubbed for controversy. Christie officials, meanwhile, declined to comment Monday on the matter.
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