Feed on
Posts
Comments



Sexist-crazed NOW prez scolds Newsweek

It’s “sexist,” says National Organization for Women President Terry O’Neill, in high dudgeon concerning Newsweek’s cover photo of crazy-eyed Michele Bachmann looking crazy-eyed.

The noble eight-fold path

Here. I figure we can all use this right about now. Me, I’m gonna go meditate.

The thinking at the White House

Or what passes for it. Robert Reich:

Even though the President’s two former top economic advisors (Larry Summers and Christy Roemer) have called for a major fiscal boost to the economy, the President has remained mum. Why?

I’m told White House political operatives are against a bold jobs plan. They believe the only jobs plan that could get through Congress would be so watered down as to have almost no impact by Election Day. They also worry the public wouldn’t understand how more government spending in the near term can be consistent with long-term deficit reduction. And they fear Republicans would use any such initiative to further bash Obama as a big spender.

So rather than fight for a bold jobs plan, the White House has apparently decided it’s politically wiser to continue fighting about the deficit. The idea is to keep the public focused on the deficit drama – to convince them their current economic woes have something to do with it, decry Washington’s paralysis over fixing it, and then claim victory over whatever outcome emerges from the process recently negotiated to fix it. They hope all this will distract the public’s attention from the President’s failure to do anything about continuing high unemployment and economic anemia.

When I first heard this I didn’t want to believe it. But then I listened to the President’s statement yesterday in the midst of yesterday’s 634-point drop in the Dow.

At a time when the nation’s eyes were on him, seeking an answer to what was happening, he chose not to talk about the need for a bold jobs plan but to talk instead about the budget deficit – as if it were responsible for the terrible economy, including Wall Street’s plunge. He spoke of Standard & Poor’s decision to downgrade the nation’s debt as proof that Washington’s political paralysis over deficit reduction “could do enormous damage to our economy and the world’s,” and said the nation could reduce its deficit and jump-start the economy if there was “political will in Washington.”

The President then called upon the nation’s political leadership to stop “drawing lines in the sand.” The lines were obviously Republicans’ insistence on cutting entitlements and enacting a balanced-budget amendment while refusing to raise taxes on the rich, and the Democrats’ insistence on tax increases on the rich while refusing to cut entitlements.

These partisan “lines in the sand” are irrelevant to the current crisis. They’re not even relevant to the budget standoff now that Congress and the President have agreed to a process that postpones the next round of debt-ceiling chicken until after the election.

Big lie

RNC chair Reince Priebus on the Wisconsin recalls.

McCain town hall

MoveOn got out the troops.

Progressives also turned out for this town hall in the Twin Cities.

Simulator

I wonder when they’re coming out with the American version.

The lineup

You all know what to do — hit the phones:

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, has selected Republican Reps. Jeb Hensarling, Texas, Dave Camp, Mich., and Fred Upton, Mich., to serve on the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction. Hensarling with serve as co-chair, along with Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash.

Senators Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., Pat Toomey, R-Pa., and Rob Portman, R-Ohio, will be the three senators Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., will name to the special bipartisan committee. Kyl’s appointment has been expected, since he is the Senate Minority Whip and represented Republicans in deficit reduction talks led by Vice President Joseph Biden this spring.

Hula flash mob

A hula troupe dances for flight passengers:

October2011.org

Criminalizing poverty

For most of my adult life, I’ve tried to explain (often from first-hand knowledge) how very expensive, time-consuming and demoralizing it is to be poor. This Barbara Ehrenreich piece does a really good job:

When the Parentes finally got into “the system” and began receiving food stamps and some cash assistance, they discovered why some recipients have taken to calling TANF “Torture and Abuse of Needy Families.” From the start, the TANF experience was “humiliating,” Kristen says. The caseworkers “treat you like a bum. They act like every dollar you get is coming out of their own paychecks.”

The Parentes discovered that they were each expected to apply for 40 jobs a week, although their car was on its last legs and no money was offered for gas, tolls, or babysitting. In addition, Kristen had to drive 35 miles a day to attend “job readiness” classes offered by a private company called Arbor, which, she says, were “frankly a joke.”

Nationally, according to Kaaryn Gustafson of the University of Connecticut Law School, “applying for welfare is a lot like being booked by the police.” There may be a mug shot, fingerprinting, and lengthy interrogations as to one’s children’s true paternity. The ostensible goal is to prevent welfare fraud, but the psychological impact is to turn poverty itself into a kind of crime.

This is why it drives me crazy when people say they don’t have a problem with drug-testing people on welfare, or unemployment. Obviously, they haven’t been there.

For the not-yet-homeless, there are two main paths to criminalization, and one is debt. Anyone can fall into debt, and although we pride ourselves on the abolition of debtors’ prison, in at least one state, Texas, people who can’t pay fines for things like expired inspection stickers may be made to “sit out their tickets” in jail.

More commonly, the path to prison begins when one of your creditors has a court summons issued for you, which you fail to honor for one reason or another, such as that your address has changed and you never received it. Okay, now you’re in “contempt of the court.”

Or suppose you miss a payment and your car insurance lapses, and then you’re stopped for something like a broken headlight (about $130 for the bulb alone). Now, depending on the state, you may have your car impounded and/or face a steep fine — again, exposing you to a possible court summons. “There’s just no end to it once the cycle starts,” says Robert Solomon of Yale Law School. “It just keeps accelerating.”
Continue Reading »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

'
eXTReMe Tracker