Feed on
Posts
Comments



Sign the petition

Link here.

Call the White House. Call your senators and your congress critters. Touch Social Security, Medicare or Medicaid, and you’re history. We’ll stay home on election day.

Gaza

If you ever wondered how the world looked the other way as Jews were herded into camps, there’s a pretty good facsimile happening right now.

Poor people’s fault

Orrin Hatch.

Bye bye

News of the World. And so the first domino in Rupert Murdoch’s dynastry falls. Fox News to come?

Kafkaesque

Man thrown in jail because teller doesn’t think his cashier’s check looks legitimate.

Weakness

Republican David Frum on the debt ceiling crisis:

Some may say: What could a president do faced with such implacable opponents? But the opponents didn’t start implacable. Back in January, Speaker John Boehner said the possibility of a government default was “not even on the table.”

The president’s weakness, however, empowered the most radical Republicans. Would one more hard push extract one more big concession? The answer was always, “yes.” So the radicals pushed — and pushed again — and incidentally pushed would-be dealmakers to the side.

Through it all, Obama has played nice, again and again entreating his Republican opponents to emulate his example and play nice too. It’s not what Lyndon Johnson would have done. It’s not what Franklin Roosevelt would have done. I doubt it’s what Hillary Clinton would have done.

Which brings me back to my starting question: Why don’t the Democrats rebel? Presumably, they elected Obama to stand up for their shared principles. But he’s not standing up. He’s rolling over. Or being rolled.

The Great Recession, Part II

Nobel Prize winner Joe Stiglitz:

The remedies to the U.S. deficit follow immediately from this diagnosis: Put America back to work by stimulating the economy; end the mindless wars; rein in military and drug costs; and raise taxes, at least on the very rich. But the right will have none of this, and instead is pushing for even more tax cuts for corporations and the wealthy, together with expenditure cuts in investments and social protection that put the future of the U.S. economy in peril and that shred what remains of the social contract. Meanwhile, the U.S. financial sector has been lobbying hard to free itself of regulations, so that it can return to its previous, disastrously carefree, ways.

But matters are little better in Europe. As Greece and other countries face crises, the medicine du jour is simply timeworn austerity packages and privatization, which will merely leave the countries that embrace them poorer and more vulnerable. This medicine failed in East Asia, Latin America, and elsewhere, and it will fail in Europe, too. Indeed, it has already failed in Ireland, Latvia, and Greece.

There is an alternative: an economic-growth strategy supported by the European Union and the International Monetary Fund. Growth would restore confidence that Greece could repay its debts, causing interest rates to fall and leaving more fiscal room for further growth-enhancing investments. Growth itself increases tax revenues and reduces the need for social expenditures, such as unemployment benefits. And the confidence that this engenders leads to still further growth.
Continue Reading »

The Texas miracle

“Bolt your doors.”

Spirit

We can all use a little good news this morning!

The event – a foul-shooting contest for top academic students at Compton High School in Los Angeles – was created with a simple premise: Organizers wanted to show the kids at Compton how to create community spirit with college scholarship money as the incentive.

Allen Geui won in front of a packed house.
Following a tear-jerking gesture from the winner – it appears the true lessons learned were by the adults.

The kids in Compton are more than alright.

Three months after winning the $40,000 top prize, Allan Guei donated all of his winnings to the seven other finalists.

Guei, a star player on the basketball team who is headed to Cal-State Northridge on a full scholarship, said he felt the others could use the college cash more than he could. He wanted to give his classmates a chance to make their academic dreams come true, too.

“I’ve already been blessed so much and I know we’re living with a bad economy, so I know this money can really help my classmates,” he said in a release from the school. “It was the right decision.”

One that stunned Court Crandall, the man behind the event.

“What he has done is exceptional, just like Allan,” he said. “Like any young people, whether it’s my kids or someone else’s, you hope they are given opportunities to show what they can do. These Compton High grads have a lot of talent. They have a lot of drive, and I wish them all the best.”

See, some people know instinctively that we’re put on earth to help each other. How nice to see it in someone so young.

Class war

Yes, “reasonable” Democrats are telling me to calm down. Good thing I don’t listen to “reasonable” Democrats, huh?

“The fiscal good has to outweigh the pain,” a nameless Democrat told the Washington Post regarding President Obama’s latest proposal to massively cut Social Security, against the wishes of the vast majority of Americans, in order to fund a military 670% larger than the next largest in the world, keep in place tax cuts for billionaires, fail to tax corporations or estates or investments or carbon, and balance a budget that nobody gives a rat’s ass about balancing when Wall Street comes asking for handouts.
Continue Reading »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

'
eXTReMe Tracker