America has a rape problem

kate harding

And Kate Harding tells Rolling Stone how she wants to fix it:

What did you make of the story that resurfaced recently in the Daily Beast about Ivanka Trump saying Donald Trump had “violated” her, and then later walking it back to say it wasn’t rape in the “criminal sense.” What does that tell you about how our society views marital rape?
I mean, if you look at rape as a crime of toxic entitlement, it’s not shocking that someone who is the embodiment of entitlement might have done that.

In terms of the actual allegation and the withdrawal of it, I have no idea; I haven’t read the book where the story was first reported. But the most shocking thing about the Daily Beast article was Trump’s lawyer and spokesperson saying that there’s no such thing as marital rape, which is absolutely untrue. It’s horrifying to hear someone – and a member of the bar! – say that so confidently, but a lot of people believe it. A lot of people think marriage is a contract that says that you own each other’s bodies, or that the man owns the woman’s body.

Also, in the story itself, it should have said right up front, right after that explosive quote: “Actually, marital rape is illegal in all 50 states.” Otherwise you’re just making the problem worse.

2 thoughts on “America has a rape problem

  1. I suspect the lawyer who said that did so because all his wealthy clients are just like The Donald, and don’t feel that the law has any business interfering in the private marriage-related business of rich people who can afford to pay their lawyers very well.

    They don’t believe any other societal norms apply to them, why should the law, if they don’t agree with it? Rich people are not members of a community, they consider themselves above it. It’s just a place they have chosen to receive the charitable tax write-offs for their non-offshored surplus income, which they consider “pocket change”, and working people would consider “lifetime earnings”.

  2. I suspect the lawyer who said that did so because all his wealthy clients are just like The Donald, and don’t feel that the law has any business interfering in the private marriage-related affairs of rich people who can afford to pay their lawyers very well to keep the riffraff at bay.

    They don’t seem to believe any other societal norms apply to them, why should the law, if they don’t agree with it? In general, rich people don’t act as members of the community, they consider themselves a cut above. A community is just a place they have chosen to receive the charitable tax write-offs for their non-offshored surplus income, which most consider “pocket change”, but which a lot of working people would consider “lifetime earnings”.

    I’m sure there are exceptions, of course. But if there are, they don’t seem particularly interested in publicly contesting their wealthy friends’ attitudes toward us peons. Some make the attempt in a half-hearted way, but fail in the end because their lives are simply too far removed from the life of the average Joe to understand what we really want or what drives us. Mitt Romney famously made himself look like the entitled, aloof ass he is on a couple of occasions, trying to appear like “one of us”.But on those rare occasions when they feel magnanimous, many are happy to guess at what the working class really wants, usually assuming it’s to spend more time basking in the awesomeness of them, or their ideas for some cheap gizmo to add to a growing collection of cheap, must-have gizmos. I’m not sure who decides we must have them.

    I should shut up now. I always get carried away with my speeches about rich people, but only because I love them so dearly (*choke*).

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